AcroYoga Workshop and Pasta with Bacon and Greens

Over the weekend, I attended an AcroYoga workshop hosted by Queen Street Yoga. 3 hours of intense work-shopping. The workshop started with some of the less scary exercises to get us warmed up. Check out this super awesome people-stacking (plank pose)!

Photo credit to Leena and Emma from Queen Street Yoga

At one point, I tried to be the third person in the stack. Turns out it’s not so easy for a person of average height…

Chair pose – it was surprisingly hard to get to this pose, but fairly easy (at least for me) to maintain once there.

Photo credit to Leena and Emma from Queen Street Yoga

Transitioning from one pose to another was probably the most difficult part. It took a lot of strength (and trust) for both the “base” and the “flyer.”

Photo credit to Leena and Emma from Queen Street Yoga

Throne pose was probably my favourite one to learn at this workshop. It was stable. As the “flyer,” there was a lot of stretching and core work.

Photo credit to Leena and Emma from Queen Street Yoga

The class was so much fun! I got to catch up with a few of my yogi-friends before and after class. Learned some new yoga poses. Got a good workout. And most of all, had a lot of fun while learning! If you ever have an opportunity to try an Acro-Yoga class, give it a try! It’s very different from a more traditional class, but tons of fun.

Understandably, at the end of three hours I was exhausted… so I went to Dad’s for dinner (and had a long walk with the dogs). Thanks dad! I probably would not have made a nutritious dinner on my own that night, I very much appreciated having someone else cook for me. 🙂

What does this have to do with the dish I’m sharing today? Absolutely nothing. Except that, after this class, I was craving a meal that was both healthy and filling, which reminded me of this pasta that I made a few weeks back and am just getting a chance to share with you today.

Pasta with Bacon and Greens

Ingredients

  • 500 grams whole grain spaghettini – approximate cost $1.50
  • 4 teaspoons olive oil – approximate cost $0.40
  • 6 slices of bacon, diced – approximate cost $3.00
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced – approximate cost $0.15
  • 3 fresh eggs – approximate cost $0.60
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese – approximate cost $1.00
  • 4 tablespoons sea salt – approximate cost $0.30
  • 1 cup Cookin’ Greens Athlete’s Mix – approximate cost $1.00
  • 1 zucchini, sliced – approximate cost $0.75
  • 1 onion, diced – approximate cost $0.75
  • 300 grams crimini mushrooms, sliced – approximate cost $1.25

Method

  1. Cook the bacon pieces in a wok over medium-high heat.
  2. Remove the bacon pieces to a plate when crispy.
  3. Bring a pot of very salty water (about 4 tablespoons of sea salt) to a boil.
  4. Cook spaghettini according to package.
  5. Add diced onion to the wok, cook until softened (about 5 minutes).
  6. Add minced garlic to the wok, cook until fragrant (about 1 minute).
  7. Add slices of crimini mushrooms, cook until softened (about 4 minutes).
  8. Add slices of zucchini and Cookin’ Greens Athlete’s Mix, cook until softened (about 3 minutes).
  9. Return bacon to the wok and mix well with the vegetables.
  10. Remove from heat.
  11. Combine fresh eggs, Parmesan, and olive oil in a mixing bowl, whisk until completely combined.
  12. Place the cooked spaghettini in a large mixing bowl.
  13. Drizzle with the egg mixture, stirring constantly so the noodles are covered in the sauce and the egg cooks (pasta should still be hot).
  14. Add the vegetable and bacon mixture and mix thoroughly into the pasta.
  15. Serve and enjoy!

Makes about 3 servings (approximate cost: $3.57 per serving).

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Halibut with Espellete Crust and Sultana Raisins from Relish Cooking Studio

This is the last post in the series from the Sustainable Seafood class. And what a class! If you missed the previous posts, check out the Fresh Fish ChowderArctic Char Meunière, and Steamed Mussels in Coconut Milk. Much like all the other recipes at the class, this one too was wonderful!

The espellette pepper was also quite interesting. I hadn’t tried it before this class. It was very tasty and not overly spicy. It was also very pretty!

I think my favourite part of this recipe, however, is the raisins marinated in Earl Grey tea. They’re tasty as part of the dish or as a snack!

A big thank you once again to Chef Mark Brown for teaching the Sustainable Seafood class and for allowing me to post all of his recipes on this blog! Another big thank you to Relish Cooking Studio for offering the class in their lovely studio kitchen in Uptown Waterloo. Both classes that I’ve attended were fantastic experiences! Check out their list of upcoming classes if you’re interested in attending one!

Halibut with Espellete Crust and Sultana Raisins

Recipe by (and posted with permission from) Chef Mark Brown, demonstration at Relish Cooking Studio

Ingredients

  • 2 fillets of halibut (or pickerel), belly meat and skin removed – approximate cost $10.00
  • 1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs, toasted – approximate cost $0.75
  • 1/4 cup ground almonds, toasted – approximate cost $1.00
  • 2 tablespoons espellette pepper – approximate cost $2.00
  • 1 tablespoon butter – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1 teaspoon paprika – approximate cost $0.10
  • 1 teaspoon salt – approximate cost $0.05
  • 1 bag earl grey tea – approximate cost $0.40
  • 1/2 cup sultana raisins – approximate cost $1.00
  • 1 cup water

Method

  1. Bring 1 cup of water to a boil and brew the earl grey tea.
  2. Add the raisins to the cup of tea and allow to marinate and cool to room temperature (at least 30 minutes).
  3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. In a small pan, melt the butter,
  5. Gently sautée the espellette and paprika for 1 minute and remove from heat.
  6. In a medium bowl, stir together the breadcrumbs and ground almond.
  7. Mix in the spiced butter.
  8. Season with salt.
  9. Pour the mixture onto a sheet pan and allow to cool.
  10. Gently coat the fish fillets with the espellette crust and reserve until ready to bake.
  11. Bake the crusted fish for approximately 7 minutes (or until just cooked through).
  12. Serve with the marinated raisins, and sautéed chantrelle mushrooms (oyster, crimini, and shiitake mushrooms sautéed with butter and terragon), or other roasted vegetables.

Makes 4 servings (approximate cost: $3.89 per serving).

Fresh Fish Chowder from Relish Cooking Studio

I was so nervous eating this fresh fish chowder. I have a lactose sensitivity (thank goodness it’s not an intolerance, I couldn’t give up my small amounts of whipped cream, cheese, etc.). It’s not that I can’t eat milk products, I just have to be careful and enjoy them in moderation. And, if I think there might be a problem, take preventative measures by ingesting a “dairy digestive supplement” before the meal. This meal calls for heavy whipping cream… so I took two. Because I wanted to enjoy both this dish and the rest of the meal.

Chef Mark offered to make a soup just for me with a tomato broth as the base. This would have made it lactose free. However, despite his generosity, I declined because I really wanted to taste the chowder recipe as it was meant to be.

If I make this recipe again at home (probably during the winter when we tend to enjoy more soups), I will try out the tomato broth and exclude the cream.

This part of the demo was especially fun, because not only did Chef Mark teach us how to choose fish from the store, he also taught us how to cut a whole fish into fillets. He even allowed someone from the audience to give it a try! (Unfortunately, I didn’t speak up fast enough to try, but I’m confident that, with the right knife, I wouldn’t do a terrible job filleting a fish!)

Have you made fish chowder at home? What kind of soup base do you enjoy? Cream? Tomato? Something else entirely?

Fresh Fish Chowder

Recipe by (and posted with permission from) Chef Mark Brown, demonstration at Relish Cooking Studio

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil – approximate cost $0.10
  • 1 teaspoon butter – approximate cost $0.10
  • 2 medium-sized yellow onions, chopped (about 2 cups) – approximate cost $1.00
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine – approximate cost $1.50
  • 3 large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 3/4 inch cubes – approximate cost $1.50
  • 1 1/2 cups clam juice – approximate cost $1.50
  • 1 bay leaf – approximate cost $0.05
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme – approximate cost $0.10
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt – approximate cost $0.10
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper – approximate cost $0.05
  • 2 pounds firm white fish (such as sea bass), pin bones removed, fillets cut into 2-inch pieces – approximate cost $20.00
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy (or whipping) cream (so the brother won’t curdle, do not substitute milk) – approximate cost $2.00
  •  2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley – approximate cost $0.10

Method

  1. Heat the olive oil and butter in a large pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the onions and cook until softened (about 5 minutes).
  3. Add the wine.
  4. Cook uncovered until the wine reduces by half.
  5. Add the potatoes, clam juice, bay leaf, thyme, salt, and pepper.
  6. Bring to a simmer.
  7. Lower heat to medium setting.
  8. Cook, covered, until the potatoes are almost done (10-15 minutes).
  9. Lower heat to low setting.
  10. Add fish pieces and cream to the pot of potatoes.
  11. Cook over low heat, uncovered, until the fish is just cooked through (about 10 minutes).
  12. Mix in the parsley.
  13. Allow soup to rest for 30 minutes before serving (the flavours will improve).
  14. Serve with a side of fresh bread.

Makes 6 servings (approximate cost: $4.68 per serving).

Arctic Char Meunière from Relish Cooking Studio

Last week I told you about the Steamed Mussels in Coconut Milk. In fact, the day I posted the recipe I came across a fantastic deal on mussels and made the recipe for dinner. This was the first time that Bryan had the opportunity to taste this recipe. He loved it! It’s something I will likely make again soon. Because it’s tasty. Also because there’s a heat wave and I don’t want to turn on the oven. I went so far as to say it was my favourite recipe from the class. When I said that it was my favourite recipe, I had forgotten about this next recipe for Arctic Char Meunière, which is also fantastic and shares the title of favourite recipe from the Sustainable Seafood class.

Meunière can be made with almost any fish. The ingredients are the same, but the cooking time of the fish will vary. I’ve made this recipe twice at home now. Once with Boston Bluefish (I later found out this is more commonly known as Pollock, which is high in Omega-3 fatty acids and low in mercury, making it a very healthy option) and another time with Haddock (another fish that tends to be very low in mercury).

I’ve found the recipe is easiest to prepare if you can find a fillet of fish that is very thick and still has the skin on. If the fillet is thick, it is easier to tell when it needs to be flipped and when it is cooked through. Having the skin left on keeps the fish from falling apart in the frying pan.

There’s still two more fantastic seafood recipes coming your way over the next week.

As a side note, Loki had her first play-date with a puppy. I’m very excited about this because, even though they didn’t really play much, the interaction was a positive one. There was no cowering, growling, hissing, or scratching. Although the puppy barked at Loki a few times trying to get her to play. Loki doesn’t know this yet, but one day she will have a puppy brother or sister.

Arctic Char Meunière

Recipe by (and posted with permission from) Chef Mark Brown, demonstration at Relish Cooking Studio

Ingredients

Fish

  • 6 fillets of arctic char, about 4 ounces each, skin on – approximate cost $12.00
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour – approximate cost $0.75
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil – approximate cost $0.10
  • 1/2 cup salted butter – approximate cost $1.50
  • 1/4 cup chopped seaweed (optional) – approximate cost $0.50
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest – approximate cost $0.10

Potatoes

  • 6 purple potatoes (or any other small potato, purple gives the dish more colour) – approximate cost $2.50
  • 1 sprig of thyme – approximate cost $0.25
  • 3 cloves garlic – approximate cost $0.75
  • 1 teaspoon salted butter – approximate cost $0.15

Green Beans

  • 1 cup green beans, trimmed – approximate cost $2.00
  • 1 teaspoon salt – approximate cost $0.05
  • 1 tablespoon salted butter – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1/2 cup slivered almonds, toasted (optional) – approximate cost $1.00
  • Water

Method

  1. Prepare the potatoes.
    1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
    2. Wrap potatoes, a sprig of thyme, garlic, and 1 teaspoon of butter in foil.
    3. Bake in the oven until just tender (about 35 minutes).
  2. Prepare the green beans.
    1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and season with salt.
    2. Prepare an ice bath in a large bowl.
    3. Blanch the green beans in the boiling salted water.
    4. When the beans are just beginning to soften, remove from the boiling water and place in ice bath to stop the cooking.
  3. Prepare the fish.
    1. Heat olive oil and 1 tablespoon of butter.
    2. Dredge the fish with flour.
    3. Shake off the excess flour.
    4. Sear the fish, skin side down, until evenly browned and crisp (cooked about 3/4 of the way through).
    5. Flip the fish and finish cooking through completely.
    6. Remove fish to a paper towel.
    7. Using the same pan, add the remainder of the half cup of butter.
    8. Cook over medium-low heat until the butter begins to brown.
    9. Add the lemon zest and seaweed (optional) to the butter and swirl in the pan for added flavour.
  4. Sautée the purple potatoes and green beans in a separate pan.
  5. Place a portion of fish, potatoes, and green beans on each plate.
  6. Spoon the brown butter sauce over each serving.
  7. Sprinkle with a few slivered almonds.
  8. Serve immediately.

Makes 6 servings (approximate cost: $3.65 per serving).

How to buy/choose fish

One of the best pieces of advice from the Sustainable Seafood class at Relish Cooking Studio was the explanation of how to choose fish. Most of us don’t have the luxury of going out to catch our own fish and instead purchase it from fish mongers or grocery stores.

The advice? Buy a whole fish as opposed to an already butchered fish because it is easier to determine the freshness. The freshest fish will have the best taste.

How to recognize a fresh fish:

  • Touch:
    • Not slimey
    • Feels firm when pressed
  • Smell:
    • Fresh (not fishy)
  • Look:
    • Eyes are not too cloudy

The other advice was to, when possible, buy from a reputable fish monger. Why? Because they tend to know a lot about their product, such as: where it was caught, how it was caught, how long it took to ship to the location, etc. Not only will a fish monger be able to tell you about their product (and whether it is sustainable), they will be able to make recommendations if you are unsure about the fish you want to purchase.

Here are a few places to buy fish and seafood in K-W:

Since taking this class, I’ve cooked fish at home more often and with better results. I used to choose fish based on the price. Was it on sale? Or reduced because it was close to the expiry date? Don’t get me wrong, I still buy deals. It’s nice to know how to choose the best fish, and equally fantastic to know how to recognize fish that I should avoid.

Do you have any other tips for buying fish and seafood?

Coconut Lime Sorbet from Relish Cooking Studio

I’m back! I took a few much needed weeks away from blogging to focus on end-of-term papers and such. Feels wonderful to wrap up the last of my courses, well, until September that is.

But enough about school, I’m very excited to have the opportunity to return to the topic of food! You may remember that I’ve been blogging recently about the Thai Culinary Adventure class I attended at Relish Cooking Studio.

This is my last post from this class. However, I attended a second class and have many more fantastic recipes to come!

Today, I’m excited to share their dessert recipe! I’ve mentioned this before, and I’m sure it’s not the last time I will mention this, but I’m not a huge fan of sweets. Which means I will usually pass by a dessert, or enjoy the obligatory small serving. I’m excited about sharing today’s recipe because it’s one that I enjoyed, it’s sweet, but not too sweet. Also, it’s simple to prepare (albeit a bit time consuming) and I can actually picture myself making this at home.

What is your favourite dessert to prepare at home?

coconut lime sorbet

Coconut Lime Sorbet

Recipe by the lovely ladies at Relish Cooking Studio

Ingredients

  • 500 grams (about 2 1/2 cups) superfine sugar – approximate cost $1.50
  • 2 cups coconut water – approximate cost $1.50
  • 1 lime, juiced and zested – approximate cost $0.75
  • 2 cups coconut cream – approximate cost $2.00

coconut lime sorbet

Method

  1. Preheat a sauce pan over low heat.
  2. Combine sugar and coconut water in the saucepan and cook until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  3. Add lime juice and lime zest, then simmer for 5 more minutes.
  4. Stir in the coconut cream and remove from heat.
  5. Allow the mixture to cool completely.
  6. Pour the mixture into a shallow stainless steel container (alternately, you can use an ice cream maker and skip the next set of steps).
  7. Freeze until the mixture is frozen at the edges.Remove from freezer and beat with an electric mixer.
  8. Return the mixture to the freezer.
  9. Repeat steps 6-8 (2-3 times) until the mixture has a sorbet/ice cream-like consistency.
  10. Serve and enjoy!

Makes about 4 servings  (approximate cost: $1.44 per serving).

coconut lime sorbet

Pad Thai from Relish Cooking Studio

When you think of Thai food, Pad Thai is probably the first thing that comes to mind. In fact, when I mentioned that I had attended a Thai cooking class many of the responses were “Did you learn how to make Pad Thai?!” Yes, I did learn.

Will I be making it at home? I’m not sure. Maybe if I have a Thai-themed dinner at some point I will attempt this at home. I’m not very good at stir-frying in large quantities, so maybe I’ll make half the recipe the first time I try to make it myself.

A few things I took away from the course are that Thai food doesn’t take a long time to cook, but takes a very long time to prep. And the noodles can be a bit finicky (the water needs to be boiled first, tap water isn’t hot enough for soaking the noodles).

If you’re adventuresome enough to make Pad Thai at home, this recipe was delicious!

Pad Thai

Recipe by Akeela Rabley from Relish Cooking Studio

Ingredients

  • 1/2 package of Thai rice stick noodles – approximate cost $0.75
  • 1/3 cup boneless, skinless chicken pieces (or super firm tofu if you’d like to make this dish vegetarian-friendly), cut into strips – approximate cost $3.00
  • 1 1/2 cups Chinese chives, chopped into 1 inch pieces (optional) – approximate cost $1.50
  • 1 1/3 cups bean sprouts, rinsed well (optional) – approximate cost $1.50
  • 1 egg – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1/2 pound shrimp (optional) – approximate cost $5.00
  • 1 shallot, minced – approximate cost $0.50
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced – approximate cost $0.30
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil – approximate cost $0.05
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons tamarind paste – approximate cost $0.75
  • 2 tablespoons sugar (or palm sugar) – approximate cost $0.10
  • 4 teaspoons fish sauce – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili pepper, dried and ground – approximate cost $0.05
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper – approximate cost $0.05
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper – approximate cost $0.05
  • 1/2 lime, cut into wedges – approximate cost $0.25
  • 2 tablespoons roasted, unsalted peanut pieces (optional) – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1 bunch of Thai basil – approximate cost $2.00

Method

  1. Boil water in a large pot.
  2. Remove from heat and add dried noodles to the water (noodles should be flexible and still fairly solid after soaking, if the noodles are over soaked, they will become soft and mushy).
  3. In a wok (or large pot), heat the vegetable oil on high heat.
  4. Add the shallot, garlic, and chicken (or tofu) and cook until the chicken is browned and cooked through.
  5. Drain the noodles and add to the wok (stirring frequently so nothing sticks).
  6. Add the tamarind paste, sugar, fish sauce, and chili pepper and continue stirring. (Note: If there is a lot of liquid in the bottom of the wok, it’s not hot enough and turn the heat up!)
  7. In a separate frying pan, scramble the egg and remove from heat.
  8. Fold the scrambled egg into the noodles.
  9. Test the noodles (if the noodles are chewy, they’re done! If the noodles are crunchy, add a bit of water to cook them).
  10. Add the shrimp and stir.
  11. Add white pepper, bean sprouts, and chives and continue stirring for anther another minute or so (the noodles should be soft, dry, and very tangled).
  12. Pour generous amounts onto serving plates and garnish with peanuts and black pepper.
  13. Serve hot with a lime wedge and Thai basil on the side (Optional: have additional raw bean sprouts and Chinese chives available as garnish).

Makes about 4 servings  (approximate cost: $4.15 per serving).

Som Tam (Green Papaya Salad with Peanuts and Chlies) from Relish Cooking Studio

After a short break last week, I’m back to talking about the Thai food class at Relish Cooking Studio!

I think this salad was among my favourite dishes that we enjoyed at the class. It was fresh, crisp, and very different from the typical salad. First, I hadn’t realized there was more than one variety of papaya. I expected the salad to be sweet and spicy. It was definitely not sweet. Actually, I didn’t find it overly spicy either. I really like the lime-based salad dressing. It would probably taste very good on a spinach salad!

When learning how to make this salad, we had a brief lesson on Thai chilies. I learned a lot.

First, we learned how to choose our chilies according to our desired spiciness. The long Thai chilies are mild, while the smaller chilies are spicier. The richness of the colour doesn’t relate to the spiciness. (Who knew?) I used to buy the smaller chilies so I wouldn’t have as many chili pieces in the dish. Turns out I was actually using the spicier chilies!

Second, we learned some safety tricks when chopping peppers. Akeela suggested wearing gloves to avoid any contact with the pepper. After an unfortunate encounter with a jalapeño pepper, I highly support this idea! While it may seem a bit over the top, you will understand if you’ve ever accidentally touched your eyes after handling a hot pepper. You may recall, I posted about ways to relieve burning caused by contact with hot peppers a few months back when I was just starting this blog.

Som Tam (Green Papaya Salad with Peanuts and Chilies)

Recipe by Akeela Rabley from Relish Cooking Studio

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled – approximate cost $0.15
  • 1 long red Thai chili pepper, seeded and chopped finely – approximate cost $0.10
  • 1 ounce of unsalted roasted peanuts (whole or pieces, your choice) – approximate cost $0.50
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons dried shrimp (optional) – approximate cost $0.50
  • 2 tablespoons of palm sugar (or brown sugar) – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1/4 cup lime juice – approximate cost $0.50
  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce – approximate cost $0.20
  • 3 1/2 ounces cherry (or grape) tomatoes, halved – approximate cost $2.00
  • 4 cups of green papaya, peeled and grated – approximate cost $2.00
  • 2 shallots, finely sliced – approximate cost $0.50
  • 1/2 cup fresh Thai basil leaves – approximate cost $1.00
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro leaves – approximate cost $1.00

Method

  1. Combine the garlic and chilies in a food processor, and mix until they form a paste.
  2. Add the peanuts and mix until roughly chopped.
  3. Add the shrimp, sugar, lime, and fish sauce to the paste and mix well.
  4. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl.
  5. Add the tomato pieces and lightly squish.
  6. Add the papaya, shallots, basil, and cilantro to the mixing bowl, and toss well to coat the ingredients with the sauce.

Makes about 4 servings  (approximate cost: $2.18 per serving).

Tom Yum Goong (Hot and Sour Soup) from Relish Cooking Studio

I was a bit surprised to find that, when I arrived at the class, I was the only attendee who came alone. I felt a bit out of place at first, but quickly made friends and immersed myself in the surrounding discussions. The set-up of the studio welcomes chatting. There are a few private tables, but the majority of the class sat around the demonstration area. I got a great spot where I could see everything being prepared and could avoid bumping elbows with others (being left-handed can be challenging at dinners).

There was even a super nice group who offered to share their wine with me. Thank you random group of super nice people who talked with me and shared their things!

I think this tom yum soup was my favourite dish of the evening. It’s something I can see myself making again at home. It was delicious. The ingredients are fairly easy to find. It was on the verge of being too spicy for me. Yet it was so good that I continued to eat. I think Bryan is going to like this soup just as much as the curried squash and coconut cream soup I made the other week.

Tom Yum Goong (Hot and Sour Soup)

Recipe by Akeela Rabley from Relish Cooking Studio

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of prawns (or shrimp), peeled and deveined, shells reserved to make the stock – approximate cost $10.00
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil – approximate cost $0.05
  • 2 stalks of lemon grass, bruised and finely sliced – approximate cost $1.00
  • 3 slices of galangal ginger – approximate cost $0.50
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons red onion (or shallot), finely chopped – approximate cost $0.15
  • 1-3 small red chilies – approximate cost $0.50
  • 1 1/2 – 3 tablespoons of nam prik pao chili jam (enough to turn the soup base red) – approximate cost $2.00
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves torn (stems discarded) – approximate cost $0.50
  • 8 cherry tomatoes, halved – approximate cost $1.00
  • 3 1/2 ounces button mushrooms, halved – approximate cost $1.00
  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce – approximate cost $0.50
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice – approximate cost $0.50

Method

  1. Preheat a large pot with the vegetable oil in it over medium-high heat.
  2. Cook the prawn/shrimp shells until they turn pink (3-5 minutes).
  3. Add 5 cups of water and bring to a boil. Note: If you do not have the shells, make the brother using 2 1/2 cups of chicken broth and 2 1/2 cups of water.
  4. Cook for 5 minutes to infuse the flavour from the shells into the broth.
  5. Remove the shells from the broth and discard.
  6. Add lemon grass, galangal ginger, onion/shallot, chilies, chili jam, and kaffir lime leaves to the stock and bring to a boil.
  7. Continue to boil for 5 minutes then reduce heat to a simmer.
  8. Add the tomatoes and mushrooms and simmer for an additional 5 minutes.
  9. Add the prawns/shrimp and cook until they turn pink (approximately 3-5 minutes)
  10. Remove from heat and stir in the fish sauce and lime juice.
  11. Serve hot!

Makes 4 servings (approximate cost: $4.43 per serving).

Goog Kratiem (garlic shrimp) from Relish Cooking Studio

Last week I attended a cooking class at Relish Cooking Studio. I had purchased the class as a deal from Living Social a few months earlier and eagerly anticipated the class. The class was definitely worth the wait! I learned a lot about cooking Thai food including how to:

  • Recognize and choose ingredients
  • Remove the seeds from a hot pepper
  • Juice a lime
  • Adjust the spiciness of a dish

In fact, the class helped to ease me into the idea that I too could prepare Thai food at home. I don’t have to eat out to enjoy Thai food. The class instructor, Akeela Rabley, has generously allowed me to share all of her recipes here on this blog. Thank you Akeela and Relish Cooking Studio!

The next few recipe posts will highlight foods I learned how to make in this class. (Please forgive the pictures, I forgot my camera at home and had to rely on my cellphone camera).

Goog Kratiem (garlic shrimp)

Recipe by Akeela Rabley from Relish Cooking Studio

I could eat this as a meal as opposed to an appetizer. I’m sure it would be delicious served over a bed of rice or noodles.

Ingredients

Marinade

  • 8 garlic cloves, crushed – approximate cost $0.50
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro, minced (stems and leaves) – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper – approximate cost $0.10
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt – approximate cost $0.05
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce – approximate cost $0.25
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons palm sugar (or brown sugar) – approximate cost $0.25

Shrimp

  • 1 pound of shrimp (shelled and de-veined) – approximate cost $10.00
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil – approximate cost $0.05
  • 8 cherry tomatoes, quartered – approximate cost $1.00
  • 1 cucumber, sliced thinly – approximate cost $1.25

Method

  1. Prepare the marinade by combining the garlic, cilantro, white pepper, salt, fish sauce, and sugar in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Add the shrimp to the marinade and set aside for 10-30 minutes.
  3. Preheat a frying pan (with vegetable oil) over medium-high heat.
  4. Add the shrimp and sautee until cooked through (the shrimp will turn pink).
  5. Remove shrimp to a serving plate and garnish with tomato and cucumber pieces.

Makes 4 servings (approximate cost: $3.43 per serving).

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